Exanimus Chem-Draugs

Deep within the Underhive, a fortress laboratory preoccupied with dissecting and preserving pilgrym cadavers has been growing and developing for centuries. It is untouched by Imperial Law, and taboo to even talk about. The Laboratorium Sepulcrum answers to no-one, yet is a central part of Terran life for those unlucky enough to live around it. Part hospital, part commercial entity, even home to a museum, it is largely a freak-show of ‘chirurgeons’ and their experiments.

Primus Dissector Dorlov, a particularly wealthy and influential Chief-Medicus, is a specialist in Mortui Ambulantes sciences. Working on commission for House Dessicum, he has crafted two capricious but powerful beings from the most suitable materials available.

SDE-112 (Adam) and SDE-120 (Proteus) are beings of a short lifespan but considerable power. Chemically sustained, they are neither fully dead or alive. It is impossible to say if they have memories of their previous lives, but Proteus was reported to be astonishingly accurate with a replica boltgun in Laboratoriumme quality control tests.

 

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Toni

23 thoughts on “Exanimus Chem-Draugs

    1. Cheers! I developed somewhat of a method for the skin which is really effective.
      Three consecutively lighter layers with the airbrush, followed by a contrasting wash, and a layer of highlights. That’s all. With the right mix of colours can be really lively.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Really brilliant, great use of kits to make something totally different and I love the concept. This is the best thing about 40k – even in the very heart of a crushingly stifling civilisation you can have this madness, and it fits perfectly. Ace.

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  2. Beautiful tones and a cracking pair of models – sounds silly, but I really like the black glassy look on the stim injectors! I haven’t seen them done that way before, but I have a feeling I’ll be pinching that idea 🙂 Anyway, lovely job mate

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    1. Yeah, something about painting the liquid level (like on the DE Wracks eavy metal paintjob) just didn’t work for me. And it’s a delight that you can get a good effect with a fraction of the effort.

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      1. Couldn’t agree more – how did they expect to portray movement in those Wracks while painting on a static representation of fluid? Technically clever to be sure, but ultimately it undermines the movement of the minis in my humble opinion… I much prefer your opaque approach, and bonus points for it being less effort 🙂

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  3. Lovely models, with excellent paint jobs. The skin is particularly impressive, really conveying their interface between life and death. I really like the contrast you achieved with the the blue/turquoise robes and cables. I also really really like the tiles base you made for the masked brute.

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  4. “..Astonishingly accurate with a replica boltgun.” Well that is intriguing and haunting! You have created really nice models and backround for them Toni. The skin, metallics, clothing is all very well done and the colour choices are perfect. The group is going to be so dreaded and eerie!

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    1. Happy to hear! The story was partly inspired by the new Pharos novel, where in th beginning the main character is stressing whether he’ll ever make it to be a space marine. It got me thinking about the fates of the failed candidates.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Amazing, the skin tone is perfect, dead looking but with the four to suggest there’s some life in them. I love the archaic look of the models to.

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    1. Hah, it was happy incident. Just removed the two arms of the original model and was left with an upwards facing stump. The model kind of made itself.

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  6. I really love´these models ever so much! They exemplify Ironsleets approach to the hobby. Detailed renditions of a big idea that you have for the group, studying new techniques and enjoying the effort.

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